Dayflash

Many of you are familiar with a number of applications to display your photography to the masses. Some are photographic centred, while others are not. Some of the photographic centred apps have been purchased and are now run by companies that are not necessarily photo-oriented and have become money driven.

I have been a huge fan of Dayflash since I first learnt about it from an online magazine and ventured over for a look. There have been quite a few articles about the next “Instagram killer” app and naturally I was skeptical. After all, I have lost track of all the supposed IG/FB killers out there only to fade away without a whimper, or accept and embrace the fact that they will never be IG but, hey that’s okay, too, this is where the creatives really hang out and share… I’m looking at you VSCO. 😉

I signed up, thinking at the very least, “Let’s get another portfolio out there to maximize the eyes on my work.” It wasn’t very long before I was sold. The image quality on Dayflash vs. IG, and definitely FB was miles (kilometres) ahead. The other thing that I absolutely loved about Dayflash was that if you were to post a horizontally framed photo with an aspect ration greater than 4:3, it would automatically rotate the photo, so that it filled the entire screen instead of shrinking it to 1/3 the size.

Notice the full screen usage of the photo, and only a views counter without likes displayed with your name.
Simply tap on the name at the bottom to view the likes and the button to leave a comment.

Dayflash tries its best to showcase your photo using the entire screen, or at least as much as possible. There is only one photo per screen. To view the next photo swipe up or down like you would on IG. If you want to like it, simply double tap on the photo, or touch the name at the bottom and a transparent pane shows a like button and a comment button. Compare that to the wasted real estate over at IG for promote buttons, likes, and hashtags.

Look at the comparison of the real estate set aside for your photo!

The other major and wonderful feature of Dayflash that’s under the hood, is that the feed is, and they say – will always be (according to their website) – chronological. There is no algorithm to try to figure out and either play or cheat. You post it when you want and the same number of eyes (which is 100% of the community) have the opportunity to see your work.

The other, albeit somewhat of a selfish pleasure, thing that I love about Dayflash is their hashtag, or keyword system. Despite yours truly’s ability to go on and on here in my blogsphere (do they still use that word?), I am absolutely horrible with my key-wording and hashtags. On Dayflash, hashtags are not supported. How can people find others with similar interests? You enter a limited number of key words on your profile when you sign up. This is nice because you are forced to choose words that best describe your style or photos without the fluff like “#photooftheday” which will allow you to find people who are that much closer to what you are looking for.

See the comparison at the end of this post to see what happens when I rotate the photo in IG.

They’ve recently added “Collaborations” – a system where you can find another photographer, designer, or model to work on any specific project you might have. They have also released a thing called the “Partner Program” which allows fans to donate or compensate you directly for your work, so that you may continue to do your work. It is currently under invitation only along with some requirements that must be met. They’ve also just released direct messages. The first message that I received was one asking if I would be a Dayflash ambassador. To which after some deliberation, I accepted. (My last venture as an ambassador with another app didn’t go so well. But that’s a rant for another rainy day.)

Here is some of the statistical differences between Dayflash and Instagram from someone who doesn’t have a large following on either. I put this photo up on both roughly around the same time frame. I think Dayflash got a few hours head start. But the numbers are interesting. As of the time of the screenshots, (roughly 2 days later) the view count is 175 – 193 in favour of Instagram. But that is the only category that they can really claim. 
Dayflash: Of the 175 views, it has gotten 57 likes (32.57%). 
Instagram: 193 views and 33 likes (17%)

Instagram has gotten 6 comments 
Dayflash 0 comments 
Of the 6 Instagram comments, 3 are my replies and the other 3 are spread between 2 friends. 
Whereas no one I personally know follows me on Dayflash. 

Instagram says that 36% of the viewers were not following me. I currently have 345 followers, which works out to be about 69 people. 
I have “70+” followers on Dayflash so even at 79 people that would mean that the smallest number of people who don’t follow me that saw the picture would be 96 or 55%. 

This is also on top of Dayflash’s superior photo quality, and the automatic full screen viewing of landscape (horizontal) oriented photos. 

Even if I manually rotate my photo 90 degrees and upload to IG, the wasted screen-space is alarming.

It’s not as simple as it was made to sound, but I did hear a presentation not talking about Dayflash in particular but any new social media outlet where the person said, “It doesn’t matter if the platform will be dead in a year.” Paraphrasing: If that’s where the people are for now that’s where you have to be. Now obviously Instagram is still where most of the people are, but if there’s a much better chance of a wider audience actually seeing my work somewhere else, that’s where I’m going. These days, (and it’s been almost a year) it’s Dayflash, and I’m very proud to be an ambassador.

Sorry Andriod users, at the time of this post, Dayflash is still only available on iOS. Although from what their website is saying, an Android version is on the horizon.

If you do use Dayflash, or have recently signed up. Head on over to @leighmacarthur.

Homemade Studio Lighting V2.0

2 weeks ago, I made a post about the do-it-yourself (diy) studio lighting that I did to keep me busy, but also to help me learn more about how to use artificial lighting in a home studio setting.

I posted some results from those shots on the subsequent post as well as on Instagram and Facebook. For the better part of those 2 weeks, the fact that the straws were multi-coloured seemed to have very little if any effect to the final versions of the shots…

Until …

I did one shot perpendicular with a glass that I had big expectations for. It looked fairly good on the camera. It was the one shot I was expecting the most from and was going to be the centrepiece to that day’s shoot. Until I saw it on the computer screen. The colours of the straws were reflecting off of the glass and were – with my editing skillset – an impossibility to eliminate with my photo editing software.

Back to the Drawing Board

I had thought at first, “Well, let’s not do that type of shot again.” As a person trying to improve to the point of landing product photography clients, this type of thinking will not cut it. Having to sacrifice quality because I didn’t want to make a new one is a horrible idea.

Out to the stores. Store after store, coloured straws, coloured straws. No one even sold all white straws. But as luck would have it, a last ditch “Hey let’s take a look here, it can’t hurt to try,” unveiled a jackpot. Not only did they have packages of straws that were of one colour, that colour was black!

It also provided the chance to select different sized bowls for the reflection dishes.

Knowledge is Power

My wife was more than generous in helping with not only the cutting of the straws, which took the most amount of time the first go of it. She also strung them on the tape to make the honeycombs for the bowls.

I had bought many more packages of straws this time because I also wanted to make one for my makeshift strip box. Knowing what I could do with the strip box and the parchment paper as a diffuser, I wanted even more control over that light.

My wife had finished the one for the bowl. I had thought that if I was to attach another bowl and cut a small circle at the bottom and join them top to top, I could make a type of snoot. So she made a smaller honeycomb for the (UFO) snoot.

Another change I made to this version was the back of the bowls. On version 1, my mindset was to try to use items that were in my recycling bin as much as I could. This included a thick grey plastic bag that had been used as a postal envelope to cover the back of the white plastic bowls to eliminate light leaks. I thought that the double layer was a bit of an over-kill so I used only one layer. But on the bowl that would be the front of the snoot, I used the black electrical tape that I used to put the straws together into a honeycomb. After shooting, I realized that the black tape blocked out the light, like I wanted, but it was also doing a MUCH better job than the reflecting dish on the back end. So I took off the plastic and taped it, too.

The Test

After testing out the 3 new lighting choices that my wife and I had made, I can say that 1) version 1 helped out a lot in my understanding of what I need, and 2) version 2 is working better than I could have imagined.

The next step is to start finding different things to photograph. The plants, water, and smoke are great starting points. I think they make for great practice. I think they are also great as exercises from which to build a solid base of fundamentals to expand into more complicated stagings. Stay tuned.

How To…

If you’d like to see how these were done head over to the original issue for the steps to do it yourself. The strip box ended up being a little different. If you’re interested in the steps to the strip box honeycomb, leave a note in the comment section and we’ll post an update!

Stay safe and have fun!

So What’s Your Point?

For those who know me well, know that I am a huge fan of Prince. Especially in high school and university, I couldn’t get enough. I’d listen to his music continuously, travelling in the car, on a plane, and studying. His music got me through exams, celebrations, and heart break. Back in the infancy of the Internet, I spent a lot of time in the computer lab at my university reading and posting on the bulletin boards about “TAFKAP” or O(+> on (if my memory serves me) “Gopherspace”. It would be very much like a sub on Reddit in today’s Internet landscape; minus the pictures.

What does this have to do with photography?

My interest in Prince led me to purchase the biography “Slave to the Rhythm”. It was finally a window into his secretive life.

Photography…remember?

Okay, okay. The book was published in 1997, which means I probably bought and read it that year. With all of the moving, I’m not sure what has happened to the book, and I read it only once.

But after 23 years, there is still a piece of it that still lives in my head. The very short version (all that I remember) looks like this:

He was at his club in Miami and a fan/patron approached him and said, “I really like your new album.”

Prince’s response: “What’s your point?” and walked away.

That hit me like a tonne of bricks. I started laughing, thinking, “What a Prince thing to say.” But as time wore on, I became conflicted.

I started to question my fandom to Prince, I became a little angry. Here’s a fan that bought Prince’s album and drinking at his club and this is how he treats him. What a donkey.

But then I started to think… “As an artist, at the end of the day, Prince is making his music for himself and really doesn’t care what outsiders think of his work.” Sure he still comes off as a donkey, and could have been a little nicer, but I had huge respect for a person who genuinely didn’t care what others thought of him.

Okay, so he’s an egotistical donkey. I’m still waiting for how this has anything to do with photography.

Well, I still think about it to this day, what he meant when he said “What’s your point?”

I’ll start this section by saying I’m guilty as much as the next person in this matter and that one of the reasons I’m writing this is to help myself to become better.

The third thing I came up with was: Maybe it was in an attempt to start a real dialect about his music. There are some parallels between photography and music: How many times have you heard a song on the radio or TV and said something on the lines of, “Oh, I like this song. Turn it up!” There’s a good chance it’s happened at least a couple of times. Why do you like it? What is it about that song that makes you feel that way? Is it the rhythm? The bass line? The change in key half way through? The tempo changes? The lyrics? If it’s the lyrics, what is it about the lyrics?

Now go look at your Instagram feed or Facebook timeline and scroll through the comments. Go ahead, I’ll wait.

What did you find?

  • Gorgeous
  • Stunning
  • Beautiful
  • Amazing
  • Nice shot
  • All of the above?

Don’t get me wrong, the fact that these people, many who you have never met in your lives, have taken the time in their day to type a reaction to one of your works is pretty remarkable. But with all due respect, what is their point?

Why do they think it’s “Stunning!”? Is it the colours? The texture? The expression on the boy’s face? Is it the deep thought that went into framing the photo the way it was? Or do you appreciate the effort it took for the photographer to get to the location that they did?

Let’s try to get some more dialogue into photography. Let’s try to give more meaning to the photograph. Open up, talk to the photographer. Ask questions, point out what specifically it is that you like about the photo. Don’t be afraid to say something on the lines of “I think there’s too much sky.”

Part of it is Instagram and Facebook, but it’s only a small part. They do make it easy to scroll through hundreds of photos and let you double tap a photo to show that you like it only to continue to scroll through hundreds more, completely forgetting about the photo you just “liked”.

More dialogue needs to start happening. As I said at the beginning, I’m just as guilty. I need to do a better job of saying why I like certain photos. After all, you don’t walk into the Musée d’Orsay, look at Manet’s “Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe” and say “Amazing” and then simply walk over to Jean-François Millet’s “Des glaneuses” and say “Stunning!” and walk away. You tend to stay for a while and study them.

Which will lead us into the next issue:

Galleries and Exhibitions